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Stony Brook University

University Libraries STEM Speaker Series: Fall 2019

First Lecture

Guest Speaker: Dr. Maureen O'Leary, Department of Anatomical Sciences and Affiliated Professor of Geosciences

Title: " Collecting Fossils in the Sahara Desert of Mali"

DateTuesday, September 17, 2019

Time: 1pm-2pm

LocationSpecial Collections Seminar Room, E-2340, second floor of the Melville Library

Please register here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Lecture

Guest Speaker: Dr. Andrew Schwartz, Department of Computer Science and Director of the HLAB: Human Language Analysis Beings

Title: "AI Language Analyses for Mental Health: Digital Words as a Powerful Marker of Well-Being"

DateTuesday, October 29, 2019

Time: 1pm-2pm

LocationSpecial Collections Seminar Room, E-2340, second floor of the Melville Library

Please register here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Third lecture

Guest Speaker: Dr. Kedar Krane, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Title: "Predicting Dynamic Fracture of Fiber Composites to Enable Protection of Army Personnel and Infrastructure"

DateTuesday, Novemeber 19, 2019

Time: 1pm-2pm

LocationSpecial Collections Seminar Room, E-2340, second floor of the Melville Library

Please register here.

First Lecture: Dr. Maureen O'Leary, Department of Anatomical Sciences and Affiliated Professor of Geosciences

Title: "Collecting fossils in the Sahara Desert of Mali"

 

Professor O'Leary, a vertebrate paleontologist, will discuss her 20 years of field and laboratory work in West Africa where she has discovered dinosaurs, fossil mammals and other vertebrates and extinct plants.  She will also discuss her role in the School of Medicine as an instructor of anatomy and comparative biology researcher.

 

Biosketch: 

Dr. Maureen O'Leary is a Professor of Anatomical Sciences in the Renaissance School of Medicine.  She has a B.S. from Yale University and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She is a paleontologist who researches the early evolution of mammals and her past projects have included studies of early whales and the radiation of mammals across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary.  She has published over 50 peer reviewed articles, including in the journal Science, and has been awarded nearly 20 research grants from the National Science Foundation.

Second Lecture: Dr. Andrew Schwartz, Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University and Director of the HLAB: Human Language Analysis Beings

Title: AI Language Analyses for Mental Health: Digital Words as a Powerful Marker of Well-Being

 

Your mobile device knows a lot about you and that may be in your best interest. For the first time in human history a substantial portion of our daily behaviors are being recorded. While this presents legitimate concern for nefarious exploitation, with care taken for privacy, security and transparency, this abundance of personal data could also enable much more accurate and less obtrusive mental health assessment. Here, I will go over recent and on-going work toward AI-based language analyses that are beginning to provide powerful measurements of the mental health of people in their own words on social media. On the individual level, Facebook and Twitter have been found predictive of depression diagnoses, suicidality, cognitive impairment, personality, demographics, and occupational class (among others).  At the community-level, Twitter has been found predictive of flu and allergy outbreaks, life satisfaction, atherosclerotic heart disease mortality, health behavioral risk factors, excessive drinking rates, and even real estate price changes. We are now working toward putting such techniques into action for better health care: detection of disease, differential diagnosis, personalizing treatment plans, monitoring progress, and ultimately saving lives.

 

Biosketch:

 

Andrew Schwartz is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Stony Brook University (SUNY) and Director of the HLAB: Human Language Analysis Beings. His interdisciplinary research focuses on large and interpretable language analyses for health and psychological science. Utilizing natural language processing and machine learning techniques he seeks to discover new behavioral and psychological factors of health and well-being as manifest through language in social media. From 2012 to 2015, he was co-Founder and then Lead Research Scientist for the World Well-Being Project at the University of Pennsylvania, an interdisciplinary research team studying how big language analyses can reveal and predict differences in subjective well-being. He received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Central Florida in 2011 with research on acquiring lexical semantic knowledge from the Web. His work has been widely featured in popular media including The New York Times, USA Today, and The Washington Post.

Third Lecture: Dr. Kedar Kirane, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Title: Predicting Dynamic Fracture of Fiber Composites to Enable Protection of Army Personnel and Infrastructure

 

Fiber composites are attractive for various engineering applications owing to their excellent mechanical properties. One of these is their superior energy dissipation capability compared to other light-weight materials. An example where this can be beneficial is in structures that are meant for protection of army personnel and infrastructure from impact/blast loads. Since actual physical testing is prohibitively costly, or even impossible at times, successful designs of such structures often heavily rely on insightful modeling. In the first part of this talk, the various challenges involved in developing such models will be presented. Primarily, the focus will be on the difficulties in predicting correctly the formation, propagation and branching of cracks that form under dynamic loads in composites. In the second part of this talk, a recently developed computational multiscale model will be described, which provides an ideal framework to enable these predictions. This model is a promising tool for designing composite structures for protection of personnel and infrastructure against impact/blast loads.

 

Biosketch:

 

Dr. Kedar Kirane is an assistant professor of mechanical engineering. His research focuses on understanding the fracturing behavior of various conventional and advanced composite materials. These include fiber reinforced composites, nanocomposites, geological materials and soft composites.  His research combines experimental, computational and theoretical approaches. 

 

Dr. Kirane obtained his Ph.D. in 2014 from Northwestern University and joined the Mechanical Engineering faculty at Stony Brook University in Sept 2017. He also holds an M.S. degree from the Ohio State University (2007) and a B.S from the University of Pune, India (2004), both in mechanical engineering. 

 

Prior to joining Stony Brook, Prof. Kirane worked as a senior researcher at the ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company. The presented research herein is supported through a Young Investigator Award from the US Army Research Office.

 

 

Event Organizer: Clara Tran, Head of Science and Engineering