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Stony Brook University

University Libraries STEM Speaker Series: Fall 2016

Inaugural Lecture

Guest Speaker: Dr. Sotirios Mamalis, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Title: "Internal Combustion Engine Research for Sustainable Transportation and Power Generation"

DateWednesday, September 14, 2016

Time: 1pm-2pm

LocationSpecial Collections Seminar Room, E-2340, second floor of the Melville Library

 

 

 

Second Lecture

Guest Speaker: Dr. Joshua Rest, Department of Ecology and Evolution

Title: "Survival and evolution in a changing world: lessons from genomes, transcripts, and proteins"

DateWednesday, October 5, 2016

Time: 1pm-2pm

LocationSpecial Collections Seminar Room, E-2340, second floor of the Melville Library

 

 

 

 

Third Lecture

Guest Speaker: Dr. Joanna Kiryluk, Department of Physics and Astronomy

Title: “IceCube and Understanding the High Energy Universe with Cosmic Neutrinos”

DateWednesday, November 30, 2016

Time: 1pm-2pm

LocationSpecial Collections Seminar Room, E-2340, second floor of the Melville Library

Inaugural Lecture: Dr. Sotirios Mamalis, Department of Mechanical Engineering

Title: "Internal Combustion Engine Research for Sustainable Transportation and Power Generation"

Internal combustion engines are used extensively in ground and marine transportation, and stationary power generation. The performance of engines is a critical parameter in our effort to improve fuel economy and reduce emissions of passenger and commercial vehicles, locomotives, marine vessels, and power plants. Therefore, engine technology is expected to play an increasingly important role in future societies as they strive to promote energy efficiency and environmental sustainability. This presentation will provide an overview of current engine technology at different scales and applications, and will focus on active research topics that have the potential to advance engine technology.

Sotirios Mamalis is an Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering. His research is focused on understanding the fundamental phenomena of engine combustion in order to design future engines that will have higher efficiency and lower emissions compared to currently available technology. He received his BSc from National Technical University of Athens and his MS and PhD from the University of Michigan. He joined Stony Brook University three years ago.

Second Lecture: Dr. Joshua Rest, Department of Ecology and Evolution

Title: "Survival and evolution in a changing world: lessons from genomes, transcripts, and proteins"

How do organisms survive in a changing world? This is a fundamental question in biology that has been difficult to answer. Dr. Rest will discuss research about how genes, proteins, and cellular circuits evolve to enable survival, using examples from yeast and plants. His lab's research is uncovering the dramatic variation in the strategies cells use to survive, including gene thievery and altruism, and revealing that many of their cellular circuits are tuned to respond to changing environments.

 

Dr. Joshua Rest is an associate professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University. He studies variation in how much of a gene is expressed in different cells and variation in which nutrients cells can use, and how this variation affects the growth and reproduction of organisms and the evolution of their genomes. Dr. Rest was trained at the University of Michigan and the University of Chicago. His research is supported by the National Institutes of Health and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

Third Lecture: Dr. Joanna Kiryluk, Department of Physics and Astronomy

Title: “IceCube and Understanding the High Energy Universe with Cosmic Neutrinos”

IceCube is a one cubic kilometer telescope, buried deep in the ice at the South Pole. It is the largest neutrino detector in the world.  With this unique instrument IceCube physicists have recently discovered ultra-high energy neutrinos, elusive sub-atomic particles, originating from outside of our Galaxy.  Such neutrinos are expected to be produced in the most violent astrophysical processes:  events like exploding stars, gamma ray bursts, and other phenomena that accelerate particles to ultra-high energies.  However, the astrophysical sources of these neutrinos still remain a mystery.  Dr. Kiryluk will discuss the IceCube experiment, highlight its most important scientific results, and will outline plans for future neutrino astronomy.

Dr.  Kiryluk is an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University.  She obtained her PhD in Physics from Warsaw University, Poland, and worked at the University of California Los Angeles, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.  Her research with cosmic neutrinos in IceCube is currently supported through a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation.

Event Organizers: Clara Tran, Science Librarian and Bob Tolliver, Head, Science and Engineering