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Stony Brook University Stony Brook University Libraries

HIS 301.02: Indian Ocean World: Home

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About the Libraries

Our collection includes over 2 million books and e-books, over 100,000 e-journals; over 450 databases, and another 3.8 million titles in microforms.

Circulation Policy: Undergradutes: 50 books; one-month borrowing period. Faculty & Graduates: 99 books; semester loan (except branches). All patrons: 3 DVDs, with a one-week borrowing period.

Renewals: 3 times if no one is waiting for the material. Can be done online via STARS.  More information.

Fines: $0.25/day, $85/lost book – Card is blocked at $5.  More information.

Recalls: If you need a book that's checked out, you can place a Recall on it via STARS.

Photocopies/Scanners: Free scanning to USB and to Email. $.10 a page for print copies. You can put money on your student ID using Wolfie's Wallet. The Photocopy Center is on the 3rd Floor of Melville, near Circulation.

The entrance to the Main Stacks (Arts & Humanities, Social Sciences collections) is on the 3rd Floor.

The Central Reading Room (Main Reference Desk), Science & Engineering Library (North Reading Room) and Music Library are on the on 1st floor of Melville Library.  There are several Branch Libraries on campus as well.

The Health Sciences Library is located on the East Campus. You have access to their collection, both in print and online.

Top Picks

Some Search Tricks

Here are some easy tricks that can help with your searching:

Putting an AND between words will search for BOTH words on a webpage or in an article.  When you do a normal Google search, you are doing an AND search.

EXAMPLE: immigration and employment will only give you web pages or articles that have both of those words.  This means you will get fewer results, but they should be better results.

Putting QUOTATION MARKS around a phrase will search for web pages or articles that have that exact phrase.  This is a very useful trick.  It will cut down on the number of bad results.  Be careful not to include too many words inside the quotation marks, because that's EXACTLY what will be searched.

EXAMPLE: “genetic engineering” will only give you web pages or articles with that exact phrase.  Other examples are "climate change," "no child left behind," "body image."

An ASTERISK (*) search is very useful when similar words are being used to talk about a topic.  It searches for all the various words using the same root.

EXAMPLE: comput* will give you articles that have the words compute, computer, computing, etc.  Or: educat* will search for educate, education, educator, educators, etc.

Putting an OR between words will give you articles with at least one of the words.  This will give you more results.  It can be useful when you're not sure which word is being used more.

EXAMPLE: fat OR obesity will give web pages and articles that have the word fat.  And it will give you web pages and articles that have the word obesity.

Use (Parentheses) to group multiple search terms together.  You're basically doing TWO searches at the same time.

EXAMPLE: debt and (teenagers or adolescents) will give you web pages or articles that have the words debt and teenagers and web pages and articles that have the words debt and adolescents.


Librarian

Chris Filstrup
Contact:
Chemistry Library

Stony Brook University

Stony Brook, NY 11794
631-632-2603